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Friday, January 31, 2014

Ancient Brain

I've never let the pain get in my way. Or the wheels. (Sometimes I feel like a spider, a girl with 2 arms, 2 legs, and 4 wheels equals 8 limbs. Have you seen Monsters Inc? I 'roll' by my self like freakin' Mr. Waternoose.) I do amazing things, and they're almost bright enough to hide the pain of living, even from me. 

I have been so busy, I actually don't have time to be sick. Illness is a major inconvenience! Who needs pill breaks and resting and insomnia? I don't let anything stand between me and living fully, especially not being sick, but it requires a re-evaluation of life, changing the definition to suit your needs. Exchange the cloak of pain for a smile, and put the tension in your back pocket for a time. But like every magic tricks or slight of hand, the reality behind the make-believe can't be hidden from the magician. 

I can't figure out the best way to list all the amazing things I've been up to without sounding really conceited and irritating. And I can't figure out a way of talking about the bone pain without feeling like I'm hosting a whiney pity party. Which is why I am writing all this bizarre preamble. I guess. I don't know. Sometime my fingers take my brain for a walk.

Um…I actually started writing this post because I wanted to talk about the Greek and Roman studies class I was taking at UVIC. See….you can never trust your fingers, because they take you places that your terribly logcial mind would not. Without further ado...I'm auditing a class at UVIC (my 3rd so far!), called 'Jews and Christians', which is every bit as rich in primary sources and apocryphal books of the bible(s) as I was hoping! I've also been studying latin for the past 1.5 years, and it's marvellous! I only wish I'd learned it before tackling French and Spanish, and Biology (and music! and literature!), because so many of these words and terms have latin roots. Although the meaning of words have changed sometime during their multi-millennia trek from Latin to English, knowing the root of words help to understand their meaning. Can't wait to start reading Juvenal's satires & songs of Horace, but I'm definitely not there yet. 

The teacher of both these classes has the sort of passion for his subject that I was starting to believe was impossible with adults ;). We met Dr. Rowe at a thrift store and started chatting in line about Lyme disease. I learned that he was a professor of Greek and Roman studies at UVIC, and when he asked if I wanted to audit some classes, I was so surprised, and excited. My love of Roman and Greek mythology started at an early age, when a family friend & librarian gave me children's version of Greek Mythology, 'In the Morning of the World'. When I grew a bit taller and could reach the top shelves of the library, I found Robert Graves' Greek Mythology tomes, which are a beautiful rendering of a culture's complicated myths. I'd wanted to learn more about Greek & Roman philosophy, history, and religion at university, but I never dreamed I'd be able to handle the coursework, or keep up with note taking, or even make it classes. 

Sometimes you can surprise yourself. 

I type (almost) as quickly as someone can speak and am learning to tolerate my robot 'Bruce' reading and butchering ancient sources ("Kay-zar" is one of my favorites, for Caesar. Oh Bruce-y.) 

For whatever reason, I can 'learn' Latin in the way I just can't learn any other subject, with the exceptions of Music and Spanish (a different part of my brain? who know!? who cares!!). I still struggle with severe short-term memory impairment, which makes it fun when I know no ones name, or if they know me. So my secret is you treat everyone with kinds and with an open heart, and figure out from their facial cues whether or not they know you. It's hard for me to think of answers abstractly to Latin grammar questions (I hate & spurn grammar. Could you tell?), but if someone asks me a question and I don't think about the answer, it is there, waiting for me to express it. I love translating Latin...it feels the same as working out an advanced Suduko puzzle.; you solve little pieces and get a glimmer of how it all goes together, and then all at once you've solved the meaning of the sentence, filled in all the numbers. 

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